plant-a-day
rhamphotheca:

Spiderlilies (genus Hymenocallis) 
… are native flowers occurring in damp habitats throughout the southeastern United States. Their distinctive spidery flowers, which give them their common name, are often fragrant. Some species may bloom as early as March in the southern parts of their range. They grow from bulbs, and may occasionally be found for sale among other bulb-grown species like tulips or daffodils. 
They are members of the Amaryllis Family (Amaryllidaceae), which also contains other familiar spring bulbs like daffodils or snowdrops (both native to Europe). The most widespread is Northern Spiderlily (H. occidentalis), which grows as far north as southwestern Indiana. This image is of Spring Spiderlily (H. liriosme), found through the central southeast. photo by Sweetbay (sweetbay103.blogspot.ca)
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Spiderlilies (genus Hymenocallis)

… are native flowers occurring in damp habitats throughout the southeastern United States. Their distinctive spidery flowers, which give them their common name, are often fragrant. Some species may bloom as early as March in the southern parts of their range. They grow from bulbs, and may occasionally be found for sale among other bulb-grown species like tulips or daffodils.

They are members of the Amaryllis Family (Amaryllidaceae), which also contains other familiar spring bulbs like daffodils or snowdrops (both native to Europe). The most widespread is Northern Spiderlily (H. occidentalis), which grows as far north as southwestern Indiana. This image is of Spring Spiderlily (H. liriosme), found through the central southeast.

photo by Sweetbay (sweetbay103.blogspot.ca)

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

libutron
libutron:

Poço Encantado | ©Valdiney Pimenta on Flickr.   (Itaeté, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil)
The caves with crystal clear water wells, as Poço Encantado, are one of the most unique attractions in the Chapada Diamantina. The beauty of the locations is formed by the combination of transparency and reflection of the blue water, that in a period of the year earn a natural phenomenon that makes them even more fascinating. During the fall and winter due to the position of the sun, the sun’s rays penetrate the cave and go through the well, forming a beam incredible turquoise blue light that illuminates further its color. 
One of the things that most impresses is that even with depth, with areas ranging from 20-61 meters, you can see clearly all that is in the background such as rocks and tree trunks more than 50 meters. The first view is still possible to mistake where the rock ends and begins the aquatic environment [source].

libutron:

Poço Encantado | ©Valdiney Pimenta on Flickr.   (Itaeté, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil)

The caves with crystal clear water wells, as Poço Encantado, are one of the most unique attractions in the Chapada Diamantina. The beauty of the locations is formed by the combination of transparency and reflection of the blue water, that in a period of the year earn a natural phenomenon that makes them even more fascinating. During the fall and winter due to the position of the sun, the sun’s rays penetrate the cave and go through the well, forming a beam incredible turquoise blue light that illuminates further its color. 

One of the things that most impresses is that even with depth, with areas ranging from 20-61 meters, you can see clearly all that is in the background such as rocks and tree trunks more than 50 meters. The first view is still possible to mistake where the rock ends and begins the aquatic environment [source].

libutron
libutron:

Blue Triangle Butterfly | ©Steve Axford   (Australia)
A couple of the spectacular Graphium sarpedon, commonly known as the Common Bluebottle or Blue Triangle. The one flying (with the white strands) is the male.
These swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae) are found in South and Southeast Asia, as well as part of Australia [1].
The Blue Triangle Butterflies have wings which are black to dark brown in color with large blue area in the middle. Those blue patterns joint to make a triangle and this comes their common name [2].
A study on the subspecies Graphium sarpedon nipponum indicates that their wings contain the bile pigment sarpedobilin, which causes the blue/green colored wing patches. Locally the bile pigment is combined with the strongly blue-absorbing carotenoid lutein, resulting in green wing patches and thus improving camouflage. In the dorsal forewings, the colored patches lack the usual wing scales, but instead have bristles. On the ventral side most of these patches have very transparent scales that enhance, by reflection, the wing coloration when illuminated from the dorsal side. These glass scales furthermore create a strongly polarized iridescence when illuminated by obliquely incident light from the ventral side, presumably for infraspecific signaling [3]. 

libutron:

Blue Triangle Butterfly | ©Steve Axford   (Australia)

A couple of the spectacular Graphium sarpedon, commonly known as the Common Bluebottle or Blue Triangle. The one flying (with the white strands) is the male.

These swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae) are found in South and Southeast Asia, as well as part of Australia [1].

The Blue Triangle Butterflies have wings which are black to dark brown in color with large blue area in the middle. Those blue patterns joint to make a triangle and this comes their common name [2].

A study on the subspecies Graphium sarpedon nipponum indicates that their wings contain the bile pigment sarpedobilin, which causes the blue/green colored wing patches. Locally the bile pigment is combined with the strongly blue-absorbing carotenoid lutein, resulting in green wing patches and thus improving camouflage. In the dorsal forewings, the colored patches lack the usual wing scales, but instead have bristles. On the ventral side most of these patches have very transparent scales that enhance, by reflection, the wing coloration when illuminated from the dorsal side. These glass scales furthermore create a strongly polarized iridescence when illuminated by obliquely incident light from the ventral side, presumably for infraspecific signaling [3]. 

libutron
libutron:

Rufous-tailed Jacamar - Galbula ruficauda female | ©Rodrigo Conte   (Brazil)
The jacamars are elegant brightly coloured birds with long bills and tails. The family (Galbulidae) is closely related to the puffbirds, another Neotropical family, and the two families are often separated into their own order away from the Piciformes, instead being placed in the Galbuliformes.
Galbula ruficauda, known as Rufous-tailed Jacamar, and named in Brazil as “ariramba-de-cauda-ruiva” or “bico-de-agulha-de-rabo-vermelho”, is typically 25 cm (10 in) long with a 5 cm (2 in) long black bill.
This insectivore hunts from a perch, sitting with its bill tilted up, then flying out to catch flying insects. The bird distinguishes between edible and unpalatable butterflies mainly according to body shape.
Galbula ruficauda is a beautiful inhabitant of forest edges and clearings of Central and South America.

libutron:

Rufous-tailed Jacamar - Galbula ruficauda female | ©Rodrigo Conte   (Brazil)

The jacamars are elegant brightly coloured birds with long bills and tails. The family (Galbulidae) is closely related to the puffbirds, another Neotropical family, and the two families are often separated into their own order away from the Piciformes, instead being placed in the Galbuliformes.

Galbula ruficauda, known as Rufous-tailed Jacamar, and named in Brazil as “ariramba-de-cauda-ruiva” or “bico-de-agulha-de-rabo-vermelho”, is typically 25 cm (10 in) long with a 5 cm (2 in) long black bill.

This insectivore hunts from a perch, sitting with its bill tilted up, then flying out to catch flying insects. The bird distinguishes between edible and unpalatable butterflies mainly according to body shape.

Galbula ruficauda is a beautiful inhabitant of forest edges and clearings of Central and South America.