libutron
libutron:

Fluorite | ©madmineralz.com
Cave-in-Rock, Illinois, US.
Fluorite is a halide mineral (calcium fluoride) found as a common gangue mineral in hydrothermal veins, especially those containing lead and zinc minerals. It is also found in cavities in sedimentary rocks; as a cementing material in sandstones; and as hot springs deposits.
Fluorite forms isometric crystals, usually cubes, less often octahedrons, and rarely dodecahedrons. Also some hexoctahedrons and tetrahexahedrons. Combinations of these forms are common.
The color may be purple, lilac, golden-yellow, green, colourless, blue, pink, champagne, or brown.
Reference: [1]

libutron:

Fluorite | ©madmineralz.com

Cave-in-Rock, Illinois, US.

Fluorite is a halide mineral (calcium fluoride) found as a common gangue mineral in hydrothermal veins, especially those containing lead and zinc minerals. It is also found in cavities in sedimentary rocks; as a cementing material in sandstones; and as hot springs deposits.

Fluorite forms isometric crystals, usually cubes, less often octahedrons, and rarely dodecahedrons. Also some hexoctahedrons and tetrahexahedrons. Combinations of these forms are common.

The color may be purple, lilac, golden-yellow, green, colourless, blue, pink, champagne, or brown.

Reference: [1]

libutron
libutron:

Ruby-topaz Hummingbird - Chrysolampis mosquitus
The Ruby-topaz Hummingbird, Chrysolampis mosquitus (Apodiformes - Trochilidae), is a much coveted gem of circum-Amazonian savanna habitats from Colombia east through Venezuela, the Guianas, south through Brazil and west to eastern Bolivia. 
It is a very small hummingbird, but with a brilliant ruby crown and nape, iridescent gold throat and breast and bright orange tail and is luckily, quite common throughout its range. It forages for the nectar of flowering shrubs from the understory to tree tops in open country but also in cultivated areas and gardens.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Feroze Omardeen | Locality: Westmoorings, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago (2014)

libutron:

Ruby-topaz Hummingbird - Chrysolampis mosquitus

The Ruby-topaz Hummingbird, Chrysolampis mosquitus (Apodiformes - Trochilidae), is a much coveted gem of circum-Amazonian savanna habitats from Colombia east through Venezuela, the Guianas, south through Brazil and west to eastern Bolivia.

It is a very small hummingbird, but with a brilliant ruby crown and nape, iridescent gold throat and breast and bright orange tail and is luckily, quite common throughout its range. It forages for the nectar of flowering shrubs from the understory to tree tops in open country but also in cultivated areas and gardens.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Feroze Omardeen | Locality: Westmoorings, Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago (2014)

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata) 
… are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum). 
Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber. 
They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested. 
Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata)

… are among North America’s largest trees. They can reach diameters of 10-13 ft (3-4 m) and heights of 213-230 ft (65-70 m), though they are still typically only one-third the volume of Giant Sequoias (Sequoiadendron giganteum).

Large individuals may be many centuries old. One in British Columbia was estimated at around 700 years old when it was destroyed by vandals; when it fell, it was so massive the impact effectively dug its own “grave”. Redcedars are reknowned for their timber.

They have high-quality wood with few knots, but what makes them especially appealing is Thujaplicin, a chemical that occurs naturally in mature trees and functions as a fungicide, preventing rot. The anti-fungal chemicals remain effective for up to a century after the tree is harvested.

Shown is the Kalaloch Redcedar of Olympic National Park in Washington, which was the third-largest known individual of the species until it was destroyed in a storm earlier this year.

photo by woodleywonderworks on Flickr

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

libutron

libutron:

Peronella lesueuri a beautiful sand dollar of importance in coastal ecosystem processes

The striking Peronella lesueuri (Clypeasteroida - Laganidae), is a large sand dollar up to 15 cm in diameter, with a wide Indo-Pacific distribution. The most noticeable and amazing feature of this species is its bright pink when alive, hence its common name of Pink sand dollar.

It is a shallow burrower and occurs at densities which may influence surface sediment chemistry and community dynamics. Therefore, knowledge of seasonal and diet movement rates and rhythms of this species are a key of interest in understanding coastal sediments biogeochemical dynamics.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Loh Kok Sheng | Locality: Pulau Sekudu (Frog Island), off Chek Jawa, Pulau Ubin, Singapore (2009) | [Top] - [Bottom]